Why I Did Not Even Try Breastfeeding and Felt No Guilt!

I want to start this blog by going ahead and saying that I am not discouraging breastfeeding. I admire women who are able to successfully, because it is hard. If you think you and/or your baby get some benefits from it that make it worth it than more power to you, and if you love doing it, even more power to you! However, formula is often presented as some horrible last resort back up choice. First of all, before formula was invented, babies often starved to death, because women tried, and either could not breastfeed or could not produce enough milk. Formula saves lives. Formula is also better made now than it was even then. My daughter is almost 13 years old and is smarter and healthier than average. The only benefits I feel I may have missed out on by not breastfeeding is the bonding and possible health benefits for myself. I often wonder if doing so might have helped prevent my postpartum depression which would of course also have benefited my daughter, and husband and everyone else around me, but I know many women who breastfeed who got postpartum depression as well. In many of those cases, the stress of breastfeeding even contributed to it.

So, you can get postpartum depression whether you breastfeed or not, but I am currently trying to get pregnant again and would at least consider trying it next time. You know if I do try it, you will see my experience in a blog and/or my next book. My general doctor and Obgyn have both assured me my OCD and Anxiety medication is still safe to take while breastfeeding and pregnant, if needed at those points. If it did start to take a toll on my mental health though, I would not hesitate to stop for the sake of my child, myself and again, everyone else around me. There is no benefit breastfeeding offers that I feel trumps the mental health of the mother, but I have seen mothers sacrifice their mental health to accomplish it for a certain amount of time for some reason. Maybe they see more benefits than I do, or maybe, it just due to societal guilt or guilt from those around them. Before I had my first child, I had been around other women breastfeeding and they always seemed to stressed out. Even being around them trying to do it stressed me out. It gave me so much anxiety that I did not even try it. I can honestly say no one gave me a hard time about it. My doctor and hospital never said anything about it and were very supportive of us bottle feeding. Maybe it was because I told them it was due to anxiety, but my family, husband and friends were supportive as well.

Although I would not realize until my daughter was two years old, just how severe my OCD and Anxiety were, I knew that I had some OCD and anxiety symptoms. At the time, I just knew for me, that not breastfeeding felt like the right decision. I came home from the hospital looking like Pamela Anderson. Thanks to advice from my sister, based on what she did when she was done breastfeeding, I put a bunch of pads under a sports bra, and wrapped a lot of cloth bandage or tape around it I believe, very tightly to prevent pain. As I just typed that I realized that the hospital never advised me on that. I did not ask either, but of course I did think to in the midst of everything.

Another benefit to bottle feeding was that my husband, or anyone else could help at any time. Some who breastfeed also pump to get this added benefit as well as other benefits. I would have had to pump to return to work like I did when my daughter was 12 weeks. One perk of breastfeeding over formula can be the money saved, but that depends on how many breastfeeding products you buy, like a pump for instance. If you google breastfeeding products, you will quickly see how quickly they can add up. With the next child, I would even consider trying cloth diapers. I know I would still probably use the disposables some at times, especially for travel or for daycare, etc. but those are something else that has improved over time. You have to invest some money initially to get some really nice ones, but still overall you can still potentially save a lot of money, and the environment in the process. Watch out for a blog on that in the future as well.

Bio: Amanda Dodson Gremillion published her first book in 2012. She began revising it in 2019 and republished it as Just Buy Her A Dress and She’ll Be Fine. The story chronicles her experience with severe postpartum OCD, anxiety and depression. Amanda is a graduate of Auburn University, and now lives in Calera, Alabama, with her husband, Jay, their daughter, Aubrie, and their two dogs, Honey Girl and Cooper. She hopes to write more books in the future. Follow Amanda’s journey on Facebook,  or twitter at https://twitter.com/AmandaGremilli2 and order her book here.  Also, follow her on the Mighty here Amanda Dodson Gremillion | The Mighty ContributorAdvertisements

Bottomless Momosa: Podcasts and Daily Affirmations!

I am currently looking into possibly creating my own daily affirmations you can sign up for, for moms and/or new moms with some advice, but also some humor thrown in at times, but in the mean time, here is another one I just discovered called Bottomless Momosa! She also has some great podcasts! Not sure if I am going to do podcasts in the future or not, no plans at this time, but I am hoping to eventually sell and/or give away planners, daily calendars and maybe even journals for moms.

@bottomless__momosa | Linktree

Bio: Amanda Dodson Gremillion published her first book in 2012. She began revising it in 2019 and republished it as Just Buy Her A Dress and She’ll Be Fine. The story chronicles her experience with severe postpartum OCD, anxiety and depression. Amanda is a graduate of Auburn University, and now lives in Calera, Alabama, with her husband, Jay, their daughter, Aubrie, and their two dogs, Honey Girl and Cooper. She hopes to write more books in the future. Follow Amanda’s journey on Facebook,  or twitter at https://twitter.com/AmandaGremilli2 and order her book here.  Also, follow her on the Mighty here Amanda Dodson Gremillion | The Mighty Contributor

Some New Moms Telling Their Husbands and Doctors They Want to Die Are Being Brushed Off

I am part of a postpartum support group so I can try to help others going through postpartum mood disorders as I once did. I was in a different one years ago that helped me so much. Many times I read about women trying to tell their husbands or doctors how they feel. You would think this may involve them trying, but not being clear enough, because with men especially, you often have to be very clear and direct, they even often tell you this. I once read of a woman who says she told her husband she did not want to live anymore or wanted to run away (not sure how much more direct you can get than that, although she is advised to be more direct and repeat, repeat, repeat), and the responses I have seen from the husband in these posts are the following:

“He tried to reason with logic, I had said this before and he knew I would not do anything.”

“See, this is why I want out of our marriage, you are unhappy too.”

“He said I don’t need medicine, that in the past it made me worse even though I thought it made me better and so did everyone else around me.”

“He says I need to leave then and leave the baby with him, even though he works from home while I am on maternity leave, and he will normally only keep the baby about 30 minutes a week before giving him back.”

These are just a few examples of course. I will also say I have seen some women say the same to the doctors and often get a response that what they are feeling is normal. It is not normal to want to die or run away, and if your doctor says this and does not show immediate care or concern, you should find a new doctor. I know it may seem I should say the same about a husband, but with husbands it is more complicated. Husbands, and most people in general are not trained in postpartum mood disorders. We did not get any info about this when I was pregnant, or after that I recall, and my husband and I ,nor my family knew much about them. Yet husbands are expected to notice if something is wrong with their wife and try to get her to seek help. Often they do, but husbands are usually sleep deprived too, husbands are often missing your old life too and the old you and the old them too, and if you are depressed, your husband has been around you depressed for a while, and being around a depressed person is well, depressing. They may even get depressed themselves.

When I told my spouse, I got a response similar to the second one above. By the time I told him, it was already two years postpartum and our marriage was falling apart. He thought that is why I was miserable, because of our marriage. He thought I was praying not to wake up because of our marriage. He thought he was doing me a favor by leaving, we could both be happy now. Years later, now that I am in a much better place and my marriage is in a much better place, it still baffles me that my husband I both got to such a bad place in life and our marriage that I could tell him I was praying to not wake up anymore, and he did not seem alarmed or concerned and thought the solution was to end our marriage. Ironically, it kind of ended up being the solution. When he left, I got even worse and could no longer hide it from others. That was also the beginning of me openly sharing my story in a way that helped others and eventually helped me as well. My husband and I also eventually worked things out.

I personally was a very happy pretty bubbly person before going through postpartum depression. I did not change overnight, it was a slow process, easier to see looking back, than in the moment of course. When I now tell people I did not want to live anymore, that I prayed to not wake up, that I thought for a second about driving off bridges or into a wall when I was driving alone, that I almost ran away and even drove down the road once, that I no longer worried or cared if an 18 wheeler almost swerved into my lane and that if there had been a pill ever put in front of me that would have painlessly ended it all, I might have taken it, people were shocked. It does not matter if I ever did act on these thoughts or would have or not, the fact that I was feeling like this was not okay and I needed help. When you tell people this though and they don’t seem to think you need help because you have not actually either tried to kill yourself yet or been successful in doing so, you start to think that this is either normal and all mothers feel this way, this must just be how awful motherhood really is, or that you are just a bad mother.

I can say that my husband was very supportive of me taking medication and never responded negatively to that. He probably noticed my medicine helping me before I did, as my doctor even joked might happen. However, I did worry at first he might blame changes in my behavior on my medicine, since men often make jokes about you being on your period, or being an emotional woman when you voice an opinion they are not happy with. My advice to the woman who husband was saying her medicine made her worse was that her husband would find other things to blame her behavior on besides her medicine when he did not like it. She could probably even tell him she quit taking the medicine and he might say he noticed a positive difference. She could then tell him she is still taking the medicine and prove him wrong. My husband also never tried to take our child, or even insinuated doing so and thought I was a great mother. If anything, I wanted him to take her more than he did, because I was overwhelmed. I eventually moved in with my parents for a short time during our separation for some help.

Most mothers with postpartum mood disorders do not ever harm or neglect their children. Unfortunately in the rare instances when they do, the worst cases make the national or international news. When a woman does share that she has thoughts about hurting her child, usually she is sharing them because she knows this is not healthy, and she feels guilt and would never act on them. In most cases she just needs more help and support, not to be guilted, shunned or have her children taken away. It is actually more likely that the mother will neglect or harm herself, but when women share these thoughts, they are often ignored and that really needs to change.

Bio: Amanda Dodson Gremillion published her first book in 2012. She began revising it in 2019 and republished it as Just Buy Her A Dress and She’ll Be Fine. The story chronicles her experience with severe postpartum OCD, anxiety and depression. Amanda is a graduate of Auburn University, and now lives in Calera, Alabama, with her husband, Jay, their daughter, Aubrie, and their two dogs, Honey Girl and Cooper. She hopes to write more books in the future. Follow Amanda’s journey on Facebook,  or twitter at https://twitter.com/AmandaGremilli2 and order her book here.  Also, follow her on the Mighty here Amanda Dodson Gremillion | The Mighty Contributor

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Bio: Amanda Dodson Gremillion published her first book in 2012. She began revising it in 2019 and republished it as Just Buy Her A Dress and She’ll Be Fine. The story chronicles her experience with severe postpartum OCD, anxiety and depression. Amanda is a graduate of Auburn University, and now lives in Calera, Alabama, with her husband, Jay, their daughter, Aubrie, and their two dogs, Honey Girl and Cooper. She hopes to write more books in the future. Follow Amanda’s journey on Facebook,  or twitter at https://twitter.com/AmandaGremilli2 and order her book here.  Also, follow her on the Mighty here Amanda Dodson Gremillion | The Mighty Contributor

I Got Put In Facebook Jail for Hate Speech

Those of you who know me well personally are already curious about this title, like how in the world? Those who don’t are probably wondering why I would title a blog this, like I am proud of it or something. Those of you who only follow me through Facebook and not my website, Twitter, or the Mighty, will not see this post until tomorrow once I am out of Facebook jail. Well, let me start by sharing the post that got me in trouble word for word,

“So we all go the stomach bug and all of us were starting to feel better, but Jay decided because he was feeling better it would be a good idea to make and eat some chili cheese dip. Aubrie and I stuck with crackers and chicken noodle soup. Jay is now sick again. Men are dumb sometimes 🤣

This was my second offense in year. The first time was a comment I made on a news story I believe, in response to a white man’s actual hate speech, where I reminded him that most mass shooters are white men, which I thought was simply a fact, not hate speech. I cannot post or comment for 24 hours on Facebook. This has never happened to me before, but has happened to my friends before and they all jokingly call it being put in Facebook jail. I of course disagreed with the decision and they affirmed it yet again, so I appealed. I did not appeal because it is so important to post this. I did not appeal because I think I have unlimited free speech on Facebook, because honestly, they are a business and they can kick me off permanently for whatever they want, just like I can stop using it whenever I want. I love being able to keep up with friends and family on there and promote my book, but at some point, like my husband, I may call it quits. I appealed because Facebook has a lot of influence and power, and the fact that they are spending time stopping women from joking about their husbands, instead of stopping actual hate speech, is well, infuriating. Actually, the new rule that applied to my most recent post took affect after the Capitol riot. I guess after years of allowing people to post actual hate speech, constant divisive posts with misinformation, many which led to that riot and the current division in our country, led us to this nonsense. Maybe they are now trying to go the other extreme to make up for it, or they were wasting time on this nonsense instead all along one.

I often see my conservative friends and family complain about being the only ones censored, but I know just as many, if not more liberals, libertarians and everything in between censored for ridiculous things. I live in Alabama and am not a big fan of Trump, and I cannot tell you how many times I have been called a “brainwashed Libtard” for that reason alone, or for even just ever simply disagreeing with him or one of his followers on well, anything, without it ever being taken down by Facebook, and I put it in quotes because I would never use this word personally, because it is still as offensive as the R word we are no longer supposed to use, and not to Liberals. Luckily, most people in Alabama, or in the South in general, do not act like their online persona or as their votes might suggest, in the same way they often make wrong assumptions about people who vote differently than they do. If you have ever watched any show or movie where some big city person starts to see the appeals of a small town, you know what I mean. That is somewhat realistic. It is one of the reasons I stay, in addition to low cost of living, good weather overall and of course roots planted and friends and family. I also stay for now in hopes of continuing to change it for the better, and the same goes for Facebook.

So what have you been put in Facebook jail for? Please comment below….

Bio: Amanda Dodson Gremillion published her first book in 2012. She began revising it in 2019 and republished it as Just Buy Her A Dress and She’ll Be Fine. The story chronicles her experience with severe postpartum OCD, anxiety and depression. Amanda is a graduate of Auburn University, and now lives in Calera, Alabama, with her husband, Jay, their daughter, Aubrie, and their two dogs, Honey Girl and Cooper. She hopes to write more books in the future. Follow Amanda’s journey on Facebook,  or twitter at https://twitter.com/AmandaGremilli2 and order her book here.  Also, follow her on the Mighty here Amanda Dodson Gremillion | The Mighty Contributor

Information on the use of Medication While Pregnant or Breastfeeding

“The InfantRisk Center provides information on the use of medications for women who are pregnant or breastfeeding. Call us at (806)352-2519”

Home Page | InfantRisk Center

Bio: Amanda Dodson Gremillion published her first book in 2012. She began revising it in 2019 and republished it as Just Buy Her A Dress and She’ll Be Fine. The story chronicles her experience with severe postpartum OCD, anxiety and depression. Amanda is a graduate of Auburn University, and now lives in Calera, Alabama, with her husband, Jay, their daughter, Aubrie, and their two dogs, Honey Girl and Cooper. She hopes to write more books in the future. Follow Amanda’s journey on Facebook,  or twitter at https://twitter.com/AmandaGremilli2 and order her book here.  Also, follow her on the Mighty here Amanda Dodson Gremillion | The Mighty Contributor

About Just Buy Her A Dress

  • Please scroll down below the comments/thoughts of any this post or any other blog/post for links to buy my book and to follow me on other sites, to be emailed when a new blog is posted, to see a link to a video interview, a search this site feature, contact information and more!!!
  • I have OCD and it causes severe Anxiety. I did not get help for this until it got so severe after having my first child, that I got severe postpartum depression and did not want to live anymore. I published a book about my experience, This Isn’t the Kid I Ordered, in ​2012. I began revising it in 2019 and republished it as Just Buy Her A Dress and She’ll Be Fine in 2020. I also regularly blog about parenting and mental health and I am a regular contributor to the Mighty, a mental health website that has millions of followers. I am a graduate of Auburn University, and now live in Calera, Alabama, with my husband, Jay, our daughter, Aubrie, and our two dogs, Honey Girl and Cooper. I hope to write more books in the future.
  • PostpartumDepression.org – Helping Women with Postpartum Depression
  • Postpartum Depression in Adoptive Parents – Post-Adoption Depression
  • Home Page | InfantRisk Center Great Resource for information on the use of medications for women who are pregnant or breastfeeding. Call at (806)352-2519
  • Postpartum Support International Helpline and website:
    1-800-944-4773 https://www.postpartum.net/
  • Books suggested by Postpartum Support International (my book is on this list!) https://www.postpartum.net/resources/psi-store/
  • Postpartum Support International Blogs including one of mine!  What I Learned About Parenting and the Postpartum Period Working in a Preschool | Postpartum Support International (PSI)
  • Top 100 postpartum depression paperback books and Kindle books on Amazon (my book is often on this list and has made it up to at least #26 before! It is updated every hour, so hard to keep up with sometimes, has also made it into the top 5 Motherhood and Pregnancy and Childbirth books on Amazon at times) https://www.amazon.com/gp/bestsellers/books/282839/ref=pd_zg_hrsr_books
  • Postpartum Depression Awareness Posters: If any of you work in a preschool/daycare, hospital, pediatrician or doctor’s office, or anywhere else new parents may go a lot, I encourage you to order these posters below or ask your employer to order them (or I think you can also print them for free from the site): https://www.postpartum.net/resources/psi-awareness-poster/
  • The estimates vary but it is estimated that 70 to 80 percent of women experience baby blues the first two weeks after having a baby. These go away on their own but another 10 to 20 percent develop postpartum mood disorders such as postpartum depression, postpartum OCD or postpartum anxiety. Approximately 10 percent of men do as well. Sometimes men or women develop more than one and how long they last can often depend on how quickly they get help. Less than one percent of women develop postpartum psychosis which is what you normally see cases of on the news due to women harming themselves and/or their children. Even most women with this disorder do not harm themselves or their children. Usually the symptoms are more obvious, so it is caught earlier and they normally get help earlier. What this tells us is that most women get depressed if even for a short time after having a child, but most of them do not end up harming themselves or their child. The fear of people thinking that is one big reason a lot of people do not get help sooner. They are scared to tell anyone and they feel ashamed for their thoughts even if they cannot help it and do not act on them. I just want anyone going through this to know, you are not alone and you can get better. A lot of people do not want to talk about it because it is depressing, which is why my book has some humor in it and so do some of my blogs and posts on my pages. Learning to laugh about everything again was another step in healing for me.
  • I will donate at least 10% of the proceeds of this book to various charities and organizations in order to provide support for, and raise even more awareness of postpartum depression/anxiety/OCD and other postpartum mood disorders. When purchasing the book, if you purchase it through the smile Amazon site instead of just Amazon and select a charity, Amazon will donate an additional 0.5% of your purchase to whatever charity you choose. You can do this with all of your Amazon purchases. I currently have mine going to Postpartum Support International.

Private Support Group to discuss Parenting, Marriage, Pregnancy, Mental Health and/or Postpartum Mood Disorders…

Hey everyone! I have a support group, but not a lot of members yet. It started as postpartum mood disorders support group, but I have modified to also include privately discussing parenting, marriage, pregnancy and/or mental health. Here is the link if you or anyone you know would like to join…

(3) Just Buy Her A Dress and She’ll Be Fine Support Group | Facebook

Bio: Amanda Dodson Gremillion published her first book in 2012. She began revising it in 2019 and republished it as Just Buy Her A Dress and She’ll Be Fine. The story chronicles her experience with severe postpartum OCD, anxiety and depression. Amanda is a graduate of Auburn University, and now lives in Calera, Alabama, with her husband, Jay, their daughter, Aubrie, and their two dogs, Honey Girl and Cooper. She hopes to write more books in the future. Follow Amanda’s journey on Facebook,  or twitter at https://twitter.com/AmandaGremilli2 and order her book here.  Also, follow her on the Mighty here Amanda Dodson Gremillion | The Mighty Contributor

Quirks That Didn’t Make Sense Until I was Diagnosed with OCD

When I was a child I would often count how many steps it took to get across a room, or to a certain point in a room, or somewhere outside, like across a parking lot and would often try to make it across or to those certain points in a certain amount of steps . I even thought maybe if I accomplished this I would somehow have good luck or something, and if I did not, maybe something bad would happen. This continued as I aged. As a kid, I would often try to step over cracks so I did not break my mother’s back of course, and this also continued as I aged, even once I knew it would not really break her back. I have stepped on some before regardless and although she has a lot of back issues, it is not broken and I am pretty sure it is a combination of genes and her former job that caused the back issues, I hope anyways. These things are just a couple of the quirks I did not realize at first might be symptoms of obsessive compulsive disorder. At first, I thought everyone just did this.

I remember the day I went to my doctor, who also happens to have OCD, and was finally diagnosed. The truth is, this doctor had been trying to get me on medication and/or therapy for a while, but I had to hit rock bottom before I finally realized that or listened. By this point, it had gotten so severe postpartum that I did not want to live anymore, my husband had left and our marriage almost ended. I always joked about being OCD, like many often do, even some that truly are not and probably others like me, who do not realize they actually are yet. I liked things clean, I was obsessed with planners and I was a perfectionist, but these quirky things about me helped me finish college in only three years, start my first 401k at 21 and buy my first house at 22. I also became a manager by the time I was 25. I got pregnant at 25, had my daughter at 26, and by the time I was 28, the obsession over cleaning, planning and being perfect finally caught up to me. I was burnt out. As my doctor told me, some people who often excel with OCD when they are younger in school, find that marriage, parenting and careers are not often as easy to excel in. You cannot just study and get a perfect grade in any of them.

As I sat in the doctor’s office that day, I pointed out a chip in his counter and told him, that chip does not bother me because it is in his office, but if it were in a counter at my house I would be obsessing about it until it was fixed. You can imagine how many little repairs, chips, dings there probably are around your own house right now, around most houses right now. Imagine obsessing over all of them. Maybe you do or have like I did. My poor husband too, because if it was not something I could fix myself, I wanted him to like yesterday. Just as my doctor joked, my husband noticed by OCD medication was working before I even did. Ironically I have never obsessed the same way about dings on the outside of my car, although I do on the inside, probably due to looking at it more. I also love the inside of it to be clean and it starts to bother me when it is not, just like my house. My doctor suggested I watch the movie As Good As It Gets with Jack Nicholson and Helen Hunt. It had come out many years before, but I had never seen it. I watched it and I loved it, and I did relate to some of the main character’s quirks. I have never been grumpy all the time or the same type of socially awkward, although socially awkward in other ways nonetheless. I have never turned lights off and on repeatedly and I am not a germaphobe, but I stepped over cracks and have had other ritualistic behaviors that affect my personal and professional life.

I try to get the last drop of toothpaste or soap out of every bottle before I throw them away. It bothers me a little when more than one is open and in use and it feels like I accomplished something when I use one up, like I kept it from being wasted. Like Jack Nicholson’s character, I am an author and I was a perfectionist. I try not to be anymore and call myself a recovering one now, but my doctor told me something once I never realized was an OCD symptom. I knew perfectionism was. However, the way he worded it really struck me, he said when you feel like other people are always slacking, you are probably OCD. This one really struck a chord with me when it came to my professional life. I often felt others did not work as hard as me. Of course, I later realized a lot of this was I often killed myself for employers who would still get rid of you in a second if needed, and then resented it when I did not get the reward I felt I deserved. Meanwhile, others realized it was your personal life that was more important, and that there is a difference in being a good employee and being a doormat.

I also eventually realized this more in my personal life. Honestly, I am still working on this every day, especially in my professional life. It was honestly easier in my personal life where I have more control, but in my professional life, I often find myself tolerating things I would never tolerate personally just to keep a paycheck coming, even if for a little while. My husband and I both found more work life balance after having a child and that has continued to remain a priority any time a job change comes up as we age. Another symptom my doctor pointed out to me was when I sent him very long emails with little to no paragraphs. He jokingly wrote me a prescription with the paragraph symbol on it once and can tell I am doing better when I send him well paragraphed emails. My brother and others have often joked with me about talking in one run on sentence in person when I get excited. This often happens when I come back from a trip and have a lot to tell someone for instance. My daughter is the same way.

I often write emails or thoughts like that out now without sending or posting them. Sometimes I send or post them later once I have added paragraphs. Writing my thoughts out like that actually helped lead to my diagnosis, my books and my blogs. These days, I still get a little pleasure when I use up a soap bottle or some toothpaste, but not as bothered when I don’t, and I rarely find myself counting steps or stepping over cracks lately. I still like a clean house and car, but do not stress as much when they are not clean anymore. We have two dogs now so I even tolerate dog hair in both, which is of course worth it for the love those two give in return. They help reduce the anxiety my OCD causes probably even more than medication and therapy ever have.

Bio: Amanda Dodson Gremillion published her first book in 2012. She began revising it in 2019 and republished it as Just Buy Her A Dress and She’ll Be Fine. The story chronicles her experience with severe postpartum OCD, anxiety and depression. Amanda is a graduate of Auburn University, and now lives in Calera, Alabama, with her husband, Jay, their daughter, Aubrie, and their two dogs, Honey Girl and Cooper. She hopes to write more books in the future. Follow Amanda’s journey on Facebook,  or twitter at https://twitter.com/AmandaGremilli2 and order her book here.  Also, follow her on the Mighty here Amanda Dodson Gremillion | The Mighty Contributor

Would You Like a Free Justbuyheradress.com t-shirt, sweatshirt, pen, mug, address labels, hand sanitizer, notebook, tote bag, small car magnet, bumper sticker, mousepad, window decal, frig magnet or 2021 frig calendar?

I will now be giving out as many free promotional items I can afford to, as often as I can. If you would like any of the items mentioned in the title, please send me an email to amandalgremillion@gmail.com with your address and what you would like and shirt size if applicable, and I will try to send as many out as possible. Thank you for your support!

Bio: Amanda Dodson Gremillion published her first book in 2012. She began revising it in 2019 and republished it as Just Buy Her A Dress and She’ll Be Fine. The story chronicles her experience with severe postpartum OCD, anxiety and depression. Amanda is a graduate of Auburn University, and now lives in Calera, Alabama, with her husband, Jay, their daughter, Aubrie, and their two dogs, Honey Girl and Cooper. She hopes to write more books in the future. Follow Amanda’s journey on Facebook,  or twitter at https://twitter.com/AmandaGremilli2 and order her book here.  Also, follow her on the Mighty here Amanda Dodson Gremillion | The Mighty Contributor