Become a Supporter of My Podcast!

You can now become a supporter of my podcast for as low as 99 cents per month! Just click the link below for details. If you are not able to afford to do this, you are still supporting me financially by listening to my podcast and coming to my website, thanks to occasional ads, but until I grow a larder audience over time, and as I wait for book sales to grow as well, these earnings are very small, so I continue to work full time, but as I make more money, I can work less and can dedicate more time to podcasting, blogging and promoting both, as well as promoting my book! It is my dream to do this full time. I am lucky to have another job I love in the mean time that will allow me to be off this summer, so I will spend as much time as possible this summer trying to produce as much work as I can. Thank you for your support!

Just Buy Her A Dress and She’ll Be Fine • A podcast on Anchor

Bio: Amanda Dodson Gremillion published her first book in 2012. She began revising it in 2019 and republished it as Just Buy Her A Dress and She’ll Be Fine. The story chronicles her experience with severe postpartum OCD, anxiety and depression. Amanda is a graduate of Auburn University, and now lives in Calera, Alabama, with her husband, Jay, their daughter, Aubrie, and their two dogs, Honey Girl and Cooper. She hopes to write more books in the future. Follow Amanda’s journey on Facebook,  or twitter at https://twitter.com/AmandaGremilli2 and order her book here.  Also, follow her on the Mighty here Amanda Dodson Gremillion | The Mighty Contributor or listen to her podcast here Just Buy Her A Dress and She’ll Be Fine • A podcast on Anchor . You can also find her on Instagram here Amanda Dodson Gremillion (@justbuyheradress) • Instagram photos and videos.

I Just Started a Podcast!

For those of you who prefer podcasts over blogs, all future blogs will also be podcasts! As for past blogs, give me some time and I will be recording those as podcasts as soon as possible as well! Check out my first podcast below!

Just Buy Her A Dress and She’ll Be Fine • A podcast on Anchor

Bio: Amanda Dodson Gremillion published her first book in 2012. She began revising it in 2019 and republished it as Just Buy Her A Dress and She’ll Be Fine. The story chronicles her experience with severe postpartum OCD, anxiety and depression. Amanda is a graduate of Auburn University, and now lives in Calera, Alabama, with her husband, Jay, their daughter, Aubrie, and their two dogs, Honey Girl and Cooper. She hopes to write more books in the future. Follow Amanda’s journey on Facebook,  or twitter at https://twitter.com/AmandaGremilli2 and order her book here.  Also, follow her on the Mighty here Amanda Dodson Gremillion | The Mighty Contributor or listen to her podcast here Just Buy Her A Dress and She’ll Be Fine • A podcast on Anchor . You can also find her on Instagram here Amanda Dodson Gremillion (@justbuyheradress) • Instagram photos and videos.

Do People Choose to Be Empaths?

I wanted to start this blog by beginning to explain what an empath is, in case anyone reading does not already know. I tried looking up the definition, but I don’t like it’s wording. I am still going to provide it, but going to clarify some. The definition I found is “a person with the paranormal ability to apprehend the mental or emotional state of another individual”. I feel like using the word paranormal makes it sound like it is not real, and I do think it is real and will explain why more later in this blog. The definition of paranormal is “beyond the scope of scientific understanding”. This sounds like something either out of a scary movie, or a superhero movie. The only way I think that may be true is how even superheroes often feel their power is a burden at first, until they learn how to control it. Even once they do it is a burden in the sense that they are expected it to use it for good to help others even when it puts them in danger. I personally think an empath is someone who has a lot of empathy. They overly feel and overly care. They constantly pick up on the emotions of others, whether subconsciously or not, because they care about other people and what they are feeling and why, so in a sense, they often feel what the other person feels. If someone else is sad, it might make them sad, because they want everyone to feel happy and often try to take on the burden of doing so.

I have researched and I think everyone is born with the ability for empathy, but environmental factors, and maybe even genetic ones can affect how much someone has. The more I research, it doesn’t seem like anyone really knows yet. I was reading the comments section of a post the other day (I know, always dangerous) and someone commented that they chose a long time ago to stop being an empath and have been happier since. Of course many other commented that you do not choose whether or not you are an empath. Although, I wonder if these same people do not think those with less empathy could choose to have more. Most people who consider themselves an empath will argue that they were born like this, it is a burden and they would never choose this. I tried to research this myself and that is undetermined as well. No one knows, do you choose it, whether subconsciously or not or are you just born this way and stuck this way? I personally feel like an empath, and I remember me being this way as long as I can remember, and so do my parents. They tell me stories from when I was younger, like how if they took me to the store and my siblings were not with me, I would want to get them something, but they did not normally do the same for me.

I have always loved giving gifts, donating things and helping people. It usually brings me a lot of joy. As I age, I feel it makes some people more suspicious of you at first and I do understand why. I have come across people in my life who tried to appear really charitable and nice who turned out to be deceiving or conning you, so when someone is genuinely like this, people are still suspicious of it until they get to know you. I used to think I was just born with more empathy, and maybe I was. However, as I have aged and having so much empathy has become somewhat of a burden at times, I do feel like I have learned to reign it in a little, and I have learned that can be possible for me at least, to an extent. If nothing else, I can try to be around certain people, or people in general less when it drains me and I am able. I am not saying it is easy, and I never want to stop being empathetic, but there are times it may be a waste, like when someone does not want your help or maybe does not want help from anyone right now. Why put your own mental health at risk for this? Like with anything else, you still have to look out for you. Even when superheroes are injured badly enough, they can’t help anyone.

Bio: Amanda Dodson Gremillion published her first book in 2012. She began revising it in 2019 and republished it as Just Buy Her A Dress and She’ll Be Fine. The story chronicles her experience with severe postpartum OCD, anxiety and depression. Amanda is a graduate of Auburn University, and now lives in Calera, Alabama, with her husband, Jay, their daughter, Aubrie, and their two dogs, Honey Girl and Cooper. She hopes to write more books in the future. Follow Amanda’s journey on Facebook,  or twitter at https://twitter.com/AmandaGremilli2 and order her book here.  Also, follow her on the Mighty here Amanda Dodson Gremillion | The Mighty Contributor or listen to her podcast here Just Buy Her A Dress and She’ll Be Fine • A podcast on Anchor . You can also find her on Instagram here Amanda Dodson Gremillion (@justbuyheradress) • Instagram photos and videos.

The Myth of the Instant Bond

There is a show on Tru TV, also available on Hulu and some other places of course, called Adam Ruins Everything. I love the show! It is a comedian who basically aims to debunk common misconceptions in society with facts and sources galore. So, you can guess when he did an episode called “Adam Ruins Having a Baby”, where he addressed things like having a baby over 35, formula vs break milk and postpartum depression, I was all ears, especially since it was nice to see these subjects dealt with using a little humor, the way I try to address them personally. I cannot find a free version of the episode online, but I have linked some free clips below, as well as the full episode for purchase if you do not already have free access elsewhere and want to watch. The episode had such am impact on me that I mentioned it in my book.

One thing mentioned that really resonated with me is that we know the average life expectancy was way lower not so long ago. This was mainly because of so many babies dying. Most people did not die at age 35, but the average age was drug down to 35 by so many babies and young people dying. Vaccines and other medical advances, including baby formula as mentioned in the show, eventually changed this, but it used to happen to often that parents often did not name the baby the first year in case they baby did not make it. Being a comedy show, at one point a woman is shown casually looking at her baby for the first time saying, “Nice to meet you number 4.” This part of the episode was in the postpartum depression section, because women often beat themselves up if they do not feel an instant bond with their child. The instant bond idea is a newer idea. While I do like that we are trying to bond with our children earlier, even in cases where we might or for sure will lose them to miscarriage, stillbirth or death in babyhood or childhood, as painful as it can be, this just proves that this idea that most mothers and their children always magically bond instantly has always been a myth.

Adam Ruins Everything – Why Baby Formula Isn’t Poison | truTV – YouTube

Adam Ruins Everything – You Can Still Have Babies After 35 | truTV – YouTube

Adam Ruins Having a Baby – YouTube

Bio: Amanda Dodson Gremillion published her first book in 2012. She began revising it in 2019 and republished it as Just Buy Her A Dress and She’ll Be Fine. The story chronicles her experience with severe postpartum OCD, anxiety and depression. Amanda is a graduate of Auburn University, and now lives in Calera, Alabama, with her husband, Jay, their daughter, Aubrie, and their two dogs, Honey Girl and Cooper. She hopes to write more books in the future. Follow Amanda’s journey on Facebook,  or twitter at https://twitter.com/AmandaGremilli2 and order her book here.  Also, follow her on the Mighty here Amanda Dodson Gremillion | The Mighty Contributor or listen to her podcast here Just Buy Her A Dress and She’ll Be Fine • A podcast on Anchor . You can also find her on Instagram here Amanda Dodson Gremillion (@justbuyheradress) • Instagram photos and videos.

Assistance for Women Starting a Business & an App Connecting Women Across Fertility & Motherhood!

“When Michelle Kennedy founded Peanut in 2017, she had one goal: to help support women.

Three years later, that mission remains and we see real women, build real connections, and share real stories on Peanut every day.

We want to further those stories by launching a fund that invests in very early-stage businesses; businesses led by women who are mothers, expectant mothers, and those trying to conceive.

We intrinsically understand the pain points of trying to build a business while building a family. We see the invisible labour undertaken by women every day, we see the motherhood tax, and we see how that impacts women’s development into entrepreneurship.

We believe that Peanut is home to the new face of entrepreneurship because our community is motivated by a greater calling: their families.63%

Despite companies with female founders performing 63% better than those of their male peers,

only 2.7% of venture capital dollars went towards female-founded companies in 2019.

We’re committed to challenging this bias and facilitating change.

The route to that first cheque is never easy, but with the right help and support from the beginning, we can level the starting line.

What we’re looking for

  • An important mission that solves a problem disproportionately affecting women
  • Founders who are underrepresented in the venture capital market
  • Companies that are pre-seed companies (think of this as the elusive ‘friends and family’ round)

How we can help

Funding

Mentorship

Networking

We strongly encourage women of colour or those from minority groups to apply.
Download Peanut and stay tuned for the opportunity to pitch using our new feature, Video Chat, and meet our incredible investment committee.

Apply at the link below now! “

StartHER – Peanut (peanut-app.io)

Bio: Amanda Dodson Gremillion published her first book in 2012. She began revising it in 2019 and republished it as Just Buy Her A Dress and She’ll Be Fine. The story chronicles her experience with severe postpartum OCD, anxiety and depression. Amanda is a graduate of Auburn University, and now lives in Calera, Alabama, with her husband, Jay, their daughter, Aubrie, and their two dogs, Honey Girl and Cooper. She hopes to write more books in the future. Follow Amanda’s journey on Facebook,  or twitter at https://twitter.com/AmandaGremilli2 and order her book here.  Also, follow her on the Mighty here Amanda Dodson Gremillion | The Mighty Contributor or listen to her podcast here Just Buy Her A Dress and She’ll Be Fine • A podcast on Anchor . You can also find her on Instagram here Amanda Dodson Gremillion (@justbuyheradress) • Instagram photos and videos.

I Got My First COVID-19 Vaccine!

This blog is included in this podcast below:

I realize not everyone is able to get the vaccine yet and some are still worried about getting it, so I wanted to share my own experience. Thanks to working in a preschool, I was able to get my first COVID vaccine through my work last week! We were sent to UAB and I got the first round of the Pfizer vaccine. The shot did not hurt at all and I was able to choose which arm it was given in. I chose my left arm since I am right handed. I later heard it might be better to actually choose the arm you use more to prevent soreness, but it was too late. I also remembered after choosing this arm that anytime I do anything on the left side of my body, it seems to affect the pinched nerve I have in my left shoulder. I also read that if you have had COVID you are more likely to have side effects from the vaccine. You cannot even get the vaccine yet if you have tested positive in the last 90 days. I had COVID last July.

My arm started to get a little sore a few hours after I got it, right before I went to bed. They told you to try to wait at least 4 to 6 hours to take Tylenol if you could. My arm was still a little sore the next morning so I did take some Tylenol and went to work. As the day progressed my head and other parts of my body began to hurt. I eventually felt like I had fever and chills. I was able to work all day, but by the time I got home, I felt so bad that I took more pain reliever, put a couple ice packs on me and then went to sleep. I almost felt like I had COVID again for a few hours, but I woke up three hours later feeling a lot better. I ate some dinner, took some more pain reliever and went back to bed. I woke up the next morning feeling completely normal again, minus my arm being a little sore still and went to work. It remained a little sore for about two more days, but not enough to bother me much.

Some others I know, even those who had the same vaccine, had either no side effects, the same as me or not as bad as me. I do not know of anyone personally who had any worse than I did. Some were older than me, some were younger, some were heavier than me, some were not, some were healthier and some were not. It seems to affect everyone as differently as the actual virus has. Everyone I have known personally who did have bad side effects with one of the two shots, did not with the other shot. I am hoping that is the case with me of course. I have not noticed any signs yet that I have been chipped by the government, but if I have I guess it will join the other chips from previous flu shots and every other vaccine I have had, and it will join that chip always tracking me on my phone I guess. At least now if I am even thinking about Lay’s chips, an ad pops up for me in case I want to buy some that instant.

In all seriousness though, I do not regret getting the shot. Even if my reaction had been even worse, or is the second time, I know there is a risk ,and I still feel that the risk outweighs the risk of not getting it in most cases. As with everything else, you just have to try and make the best decision for you and your family, but the general population was also factored into my decision because I am I ready for this to end soon for all of us. I go back for my second shot on March 31st and I think I will ask for this one in the right arm. Turns out you have a choice both times and are not even required to switch arms, but I think I would like to and I will let you know how the next one goes in another blog to follow….

I Got the Second and Final Round of My Covid-19 vaccine! – Just Buy Her A Dress and She’ll Be Fine

Have you had your vaccine yet? What was your experience like?

Bio: Amanda Dodson Gremillion published her first book in 2012. She began revising it in 2019 and republished it as Just Buy Her A Dress and She’ll Be Fine. The story chronicles her experience with severe postpartum OCD, anxiety and depression. Amanda is a graduate of Auburn University, and now lives in Calera, Alabama, with her husband, Jay, their daughter, Aubrie, and their two dogs, Honey Girl and Cooper. She hopes to write more books in the future. Follow Amanda’s journey on Facebook,  or twitter at https://twitter.com/AmandaGremilli2 and order her book here.  Also, follow her on the Mighty here Amanda Dodson Gremillion | The Mighty Contributor or listen to her podcast here Just Buy Her A Dress and She’ll Be Fine • A podcast on Anchor . You can also find her on Instagram here Amanda Dodson Gremillion (@justbuyheradress) • Instagram photos and videos.

Why I Did Not Even Try Breastfeeding and Felt No Guilt!

I want to start this blog by going ahead and saying that I am not discouraging breastfeeding. I admire women who are able to successfully, because it is hard. If you think you and/or your baby get some benefits from it that make it worth it than more power to you, and if you love doing it, even more power to you! However, formula is often presented as some horrible last resort back up choice. First of all, before formula was invented, babies often starved to death, because women tried, and either could not breastfeed or could not produce enough milk. Formula saves lives. Formula is also better made now than it was even then. My daughter is almost 13 years old and is smarter and healthier than average. The only benefits I feel I may have missed out on by not breastfeeding is the bonding and possible health benefits for myself. I often wonder if doing so might have helped prevent my postpartum depression which would of course also have benefited my daughter, and husband and everyone else around me, but I know many women who breastfeed who got postpartum depression as well. In many of those cases, the stress of breastfeeding even contributed to it.

So, you can get postpartum depression whether you breastfeed or not, but I am currently trying to get pregnant again and would at least consider trying it next time. You know if I do try it, you will see my experience in a blog and/or my next book. My general doctor and Obgyn have both assured me my OCD and Anxiety medication is still safe to take while breastfeeding and pregnant, if needed at those points. If it did start to take a toll on my mental health though, I would not hesitate to stop for the sake of my child, myself and again, everyone else around me. There is no benefit breastfeeding offers that I feel trumps the mental health of the mother, but I have seen mothers sacrifice their mental health to accomplish it for a certain amount of time for some reason. Maybe they see more benefits than I do, or maybe, it just due to societal guilt or guilt from those around them. Before I had my first child, I had been around other women breastfeeding and they always seemed so stressed out. Even being around them trying to do it stressed me out. It gave me so much anxiety that I did not even try it. I can honestly say no one gave me a hard time about it. My doctor and hospital never said anything about it and were very supportive of us bottle feeding. Maybe it was because I told them it was due to anxiety, but my family, husband and friends were supportive as well.

Although I would not realize until my daughter was two years old, just how severe my OCD and Anxiety were, I knew that I had some OCD and anxiety symptoms. At the time, I just knew for me, that not breastfeeding felt like the right decision. I came home from the hospital looking like Pamela Anderson. Thanks to advice from my sister, based on what she did when she was done breastfeeding, I put a bunch of nursing pads under a sports bra, and wrapped a lot of cloth bandage or tape around it I believe, very tightly to prevent pain. As I just typed that I realized that the hospital never advised me on that. I did not ask either, but of course I did think to in the midst of everything. I also just realized you will need nursing pads, even if you don’t actually nurse.

Another benefit to bottle feeding was that my husband, or anyone else could help at any time. Some who breastfeed also pump to get this added benefit as well as other benefits. I would have had to pump to return to work like I did when my daughter was 12 weeks. One perk of breastfeeding over formula can be the money saved, but that depends on how many breastfeeding products you buy, like a pump for instance. If you google breastfeeding products, you will see how quickly they can add up. With the next child, I would even consider trying cloth diapers. I know I would still probably use the disposables some at times, especially for travel or for daycare, etc. but those are something else that has improved over time. You have to invest some money initially to get some really nice ones, but still overall you can still potentially save a lot of money, and the environment in the process. Watch out for a blog on that in the future as well.

Bio: Amanda Dodson Gremillion published her first book in 2012. She began revising it in 2019 and republished it as Just Buy Her A Dress and She’ll Be Fine. The story chronicles her experience with severe postpartum OCD, anxiety and depression. Amanda is a graduate of Auburn University, and now lives in Calera, Alabama, with her husband, Jay, their daughter, Aubrie, and their two dogs, Honey Girl and Cooper. She hopes to write more books in the future. Follow Amanda’s journey on Facebook,  or twitter at https://twitter.com/AmandaGremilli2 and order her book here.  Also, follow her on the Mighty here Amanda Dodson Gremillion | The Mighty Contributor or listen to her podcast here Just Buy Her A Dress and She’ll Be Fine • A podcast on Anchor . You can also find her on Instagram here Amanda Dodson Gremillion (@justbuyheradress) • Instagram photos and videos.

Bottomless Momosa: Podcasts and Daily Affirmations!

I am currently looking into possibly creating my own daily affirmations you can sign up for, for moms and/or new moms with some advice, but also some humor thrown in at times, but in the mean time, here is another one I just discovered called Bottomless Momosa! She also has some great podcasts! Not sure if I am going to do podcasts in the future or not, no plans at this time, but I am hoping to eventually sell and/or give away planners, daily calendars and maybe even journals for moms.

@bottomless__momosa | Linktree

Bio: Amanda Dodson Gremillion published her first book in 2012. She began revising it in 2019 and republished it as Just Buy Her A Dress and She’ll Be Fine. The story chronicles her experience with severe postpartum OCD, anxiety and depression. Amanda is a graduate of Auburn University, and now lives in Calera, Alabama, with her husband, Jay, their daughter, Aubrie, and their two dogs, Honey Girl and Cooper. She hopes to write more books in the future. Follow Amanda’s journey on Facebook,  or twitter at https://twitter.com/AmandaGremilli2 and order her book here.  Also, follow her on the Mighty here Amanda Dodson Gremillion | The Mighty Contributor or listen to her podcast here Just Buy Her A Dress and She’ll Be Fine • A podcast on Anchor . You can also find her on Instagram here Amanda Dodson Gremillion (@justbuyheradress) • Instagram photos and videos.

Some New Moms Telling Their Husbands and Doctors They Want to Die Are Being Brushed Off

I am part of a postpartum support group so I can try to help others going through postpartum mood disorders as I once did. I was in a different one years ago that helped me so much. Many times I read about women trying to tell their husbands or doctors how they feel. You would think this may involve them trying, but not being clear enough, because with men especially, you often have to be very clear and direct, they even often tell you this. I once read of a woman who says she told her husband she did not want to live anymore or wanted to run away (not sure how much more direct you can get than that, although she is advised to be more direct and repeat, repeat, repeat), and the responses I have seen from the husband in these posts are the following:

“He tried to reason with logic, I had said this before and he knew I would not do anything.”

“See, this is why I want out of our marriage, you are unhappy too.”

“He said I don’t need medicine, that in the past it made me worse even though I thought it made me better and so did everyone else around me.”

“He says I need to leave then and leave the baby with him, even though he works from home while I am on maternity leave, and he will normally only keep the baby about 30 minutes a week before giving him back.”

These are just a few examples of course. I will also say I have seen some women say the same to the doctors and often get a response that what they are feeling is normal. It is not normal to want to die or run away, and if your doctor says this and does not show immediate care or concern, you should find a new doctor. I know it may seem I should say the same about a husband, but with husbands it is more complicated. Husbands, and most people in general are not trained in postpartum mood disorders. We did not get any info about this when I was pregnant, or after that I recall, and my husband and I ,nor my family knew much about them. Yet husbands are expected to notice if something is wrong with their wife and try to get her to seek help. Often they do, but husbands are usually sleep deprived too, husbands are often missing your old life too and the old you and the old them too, and if you are depressed, your husband has been around you depressed for a while, and being around a depressed person is well, depressing. They may even get depressed themselves.

When I told my spouse, I got a response similar to the second one above. By the time I told him, it was already two years postpartum and our marriage was falling apart. He thought that is why I was miserable, because of our marriage. He thought I was praying not to wake up because of our marriage. He thought he was doing me a favor by leaving, we could both be happy now. Years later, now that I am in a much better place and my marriage is in a much better place, it still baffles me that my husband I both got to such a bad place in life and our marriage that I could tell him I was praying to not wake up anymore, and he did not seem alarmed or concerned and thought the solution was to end our marriage. Ironically, it kind of ended up being the solution. When he left, I got even worse and could no longer hide it from others. That was also the beginning of me openly sharing my story in a way that helped others and eventually helped me as well. My husband and I also eventually worked things out.

I personally was a very happy pretty bubbly person before going through postpartum depression. I did not change overnight, it was a slow process, easier to see looking back, than in the moment of course. When I now tell people I did not want to live anymore, that I prayed to not wake up, that I thought for a second about driving off bridges or into a wall when I was driving alone, that I almost ran away and even drove down the road once, that I no longer worried or cared if an 18 wheeler almost swerved into my lane and that if there had been a pill ever put in front of me that would have painlessly ended it all, I might have taken it, people were shocked. It does not matter if I ever did act on these thoughts or would have or not, the fact that I was feeling like this was not okay and I needed help. When you tell people this though and they don’t seem to think you need help because you have not actually either tried to kill yourself yet or been successful in doing so, you start to think that this is either normal and all mothers feel this way, this must just be how awful motherhood really is, or that you are just a bad mother.

I can say that my husband was very supportive of me taking medication and never responded negatively to that. He probably noticed my medicine helping me before I did, as my doctor even joked might happen. However, I did worry at first he might blame changes in my behavior on my medicine, since men often make jokes about you being on your period, or being an emotional woman when you voice an opinion they are not happy with. My advice to the woman who husband was saying her medicine made her worse was that her husband would find other things to blame her behavior on besides her medicine when he did not like it. She could probably even tell him she quit taking the medicine and he might say he noticed a positive difference. She could then tell him she is still taking the medicine and prove him wrong. My husband also never tried to take our child, or even insinuated doing so and thought I was a great mother. If anything, I wanted him to take her more than he did, because I was overwhelmed. I eventually moved in with my parents for a short time during our separation for some help.

Most mothers with postpartum mood disorders do not ever harm or neglect their children. Unfortunately in the rare instances when they do, the worst cases make the national or international news. When a woman does share that she has thoughts about hurting her child, usually she is sharing them because she knows this is not healthy, and she feels guilt and would never act on them. In most cases she just needs more help and support, not to be guilted, shunned or have her children taken away. It is actually more likely that the mother will neglect or harm herself, but when women share these thoughts, they are often ignored and that really needs to change.

Bio: Amanda Dodson Gremillion published her first book in 2012. She began revising it in 2019 and republished it as Just Buy Her A Dress and She’ll Be Fine. The story chronicles her experience with severe postpartum OCD, anxiety and depression. Amanda is a graduate of Auburn University, and now lives in Calera, Alabama, with her husband, Jay, their daughter, Aubrie, and their two dogs, Honey Girl and Cooper. She hopes to write more books in the future. Follow Amanda’s journey on Facebook,  or twitter at https://twitter.com/AmandaGremilli2 and order her book here.  Also, follow her on the Mighty here Amanda Dodson Gremillion | The Mighty Contributor or listen to her podcast here Just Buy Her A Dress and She’ll Be Fine • A podcast on Anchor . You can also find her on Instagram here Amanda Dodson Gremillion (@justbuyheradress) • Instagram photos and videos.

I Got Put In Facebook Jail for Hate Speech

Those of you who know me well personally are already curious about this title, like how in the world? Those who don’t are probably wondering why I would title a blog this, like I am proud of it or something. Those of you who only follow me through Facebook and not my website, Twitter, or the Mighty, will not see this post until tomorrow once I am out of Facebook jail. Well, let me start by sharing the post that got me in trouble word for word,

“So we all go the stomach bug and all of us were starting to feel better, but Jay decided because he was feeling better it would be a good idea to make and eat some chili cheese dip. Aubrie and I stuck with crackers and chicken noodle soup. Jay is now sick again. Men are dumb sometimes 🤣

This was my second offense in year. The first time was a comment I made on a news story I believe, in response to a white man’s actual hate speech, where I reminded him that most mass shooters are white men, which I thought was simply a fact, not hate speech. I cannot post or comment for 24 hours on Facebook. This has never happened to me before, but has happened to my friends before and they all jokingly call it being put in Facebook jail. I of course disagreed with the decision and they affirmed it yet again, so I appealed. I did not appeal because it is so important to post this. I did not appeal because I think I have unlimited free speech on Facebook, because honestly, they are a business and they can kick me off permanently for whatever they want, just like I can stop using it whenever I want. I love being able to keep up with friends and family on there and promote my book, but at some point, like my husband, I may call it quits. I appealed because Facebook has a lot of influence and power, and the fact that they are spending time stopping women from joking about their husbands, instead of stopping actual hate speech, is well, infuriating. Actually, the new rule that applied to my most recent post took affect after the Capitol riot. I guess after years of allowing people to post actual hate speech, constant divisive posts with misinformation, many which led to that riot and the current division in our country, led us to this nonsense. Maybe they are now trying to go the other extreme to make up for it, or they were wasting time on this nonsense instead all along one.

I often see my conservative friends and family complain about being the only ones censored, but I know just as many, if not more liberals, libertarians and everything in between censored for ridiculous things. I live in Alabama and am not a big fan of Trump, and I cannot tell you how many times I have been called a “brainwashed Libtard” for that reason alone, or for even just ever simply disagreeing with him or one of his followers on well, anything, without it ever being taken down by Facebook, and I put it in quotes because I would never use this word personally, because it is still as offensive as the R word we are no longer supposed to use, and not to Liberals. Luckily, most people in Alabama, or in the South in general, do not act like their online persona or as their votes might suggest, in the same way they often make wrong assumptions about people who vote differently than they do. If you have ever watched any show or movie where some big city person starts to see the appeals of a small town, you know what I mean. That is somewhat realistic. It is one of the reasons I stay, in addition to low cost of living, good weather overall and of course roots planted and friends and family. I also stay for now in hopes of continuing to change it for the better, and the same goes for Facebook.

So what have you been put in Facebook jail for? Please comment below….

Bio: Amanda Dodson Gremillion published her first book in 2012. She began revising it in 2019 and republished it as Just Buy Her A Dress and She’ll Be Fine. The story chronicles her experience with severe postpartum OCD, anxiety and depression. Amanda is a graduate of Auburn University, and now lives in Calera, Alabama, with her husband, Jay, their daughter, Aubrie, and their two dogs, Honey Girl and Cooper. She hopes to write more books in the future. Follow Amanda’s journey on Facebook,  or twitter at https://twitter.com/AmandaGremilli2 and order her book here.  Also, follow her on the Mighty here Amanda Dodson Gremillion | The Mighty Contributor or listen to her podcast here Just Buy Her A Dress and She’ll Be Fine • A podcast on Anchor . You can also find her on Instagram here Amanda Dodson Gremillion (@justbuyheradress) • Instagram photos and videos.